International Rock Flipping Day

Garlic Glass-snail | Oxychilus alliarius (left) and Vallonia sp. (right) Today is International Rock Flipping Day and in celebration I went out into our garden and turned over a few bricks to see what I could find. Despite living in a fairly urban environment our garden has attracted a number of interesting insects, reptiles, amphibians, arthropods, gastropods, arachnids, and birds. …

Puddling in Paradise

Zephyr Anglewing | Polygonia zephyrus Zephyr anglewings (Polygonia zephyrus) have been fairly regular in the parking lot at Paradise Meadows, Strathcona Provincial Park this week. Anglewings belong to Nymphalinae which is a subfamily of the family Nymphalidae. The genus name Polygonia (Greek – many-angled) refers to the shape of the wings of this butterfly. The distinctive angles and indentations produce …

Back in the Garden

With two young children it’s often difficult to get out to a new location to photograph. As a result, I usually have to revisit a location that I’ve photographed before – the challenge then becomes how to create new images with the same subjects. Taking the time to look at details, repositioning the camera and playing with depth of field …

What Wasp is That?

I spent some time this week in my mother-in-law’s garden photographing wasps, bees and other insects but am finding it challenging to identify them. These wasps were unconcerned about me being close to them so I was able to get some good photographs of these fascinating insects. I’m working on identifying conclusively the wasps/insects pictured below. The photographs were taken …

More Garden Insects

Bumble Bee on Echinacea Given that I had little success photographing bumble bees on my last visit to our garden I was determined to try again. One of the advantages of using a digital SLR instead of film that you can capture an unlimited number of images without having to worry about cost – this is beneficial when trying to …

Zen In the Garden

We’re lucky enough to have a backyard garden despite living close to the center of Courtenay. Not only is our garden a source of food for us, many insects (and other animals) visit as well. I spent some time watching bumble bees and honey bees gathering pollen and nectar but was really fascinated by the work of wasps and hornets …