Musing about Merville Mushrooms

We’ve had some fairly wet weather over the last week and the mushrooms are loving it. Fall is a great time of year on the West Coast for the mushroom enthusiast and Jocie and I took the toddlers out to “look for mushrooms.” An excellent place to find a variety of mushrooms in the Comox Valley is out at Merville …

Return of the Panther

Panther Amanita (Amanita pantherina) showing partial veil, brown cap and whitish warts. Yesterday I noticed lots of Chocolate Slugs (Arion rufus) while walking at Seal Bay Regional Park. Most were simply crossing the trail, moving from one forested side across the relatively easy going “smooth” path to the other. Later in my walk I found some amanitas and once I …

Antlers in the Woods

Two cool fungi that I’ve found in the woods this winter resemble small antlers poking out of the ground or wood. They are distinctive and easy to find if one looks actively for them. Carbon Antlers (or Candlesnuff Fungus) Carbon Antlers (Xylaria hypoxylon) showing distinctive white forks that suggest antlers. Carbon Antlers (Xylaria hypoxylon) is a small distinctive black fungus …

Toothed Jelly Fungus

One of the bonuses of doing a bird count is that you often end up in places that you haven’t been before. Such was the case yesterday when I was scouting out Seal Bay Regional Park which is in my assigned count area. I usually access Seal Bay from the main parking lot on Bates Road but in this case …

Everyone Loves Amanitas

Fly Amanita (Amanita muscaria) You have to admit that the Amanitas are distinctive. One of the easiest to recognize is the striking red and white Fly Amanita (Amanita muscaria). This mushroom is the classic “toad stool,” and considered both poisonous and hallucinogenic. As Arora puts it, the Fly Amanita is “esteemed by both maggots and mystics” but he goes on …

Jelly Crep

Jelly Crep (Crepidotus mollis) on a dead tree. I have to admit that I’m fascinated with all the mushrooms that I’ve been discovering this fall (and now early winter). I found these Jelly Creps (Crepidotus mollis) growing on a dead tree in an open lot a few blocks from our house. The older ones were larger and smoother, and pale …

Merville Woods Mushrooms – Part 2

Earlier in November we enjoyed some mushrooms at Merville Woods, a second growth forest characterized by mixed conifers including pines. This post features a few more mushrooms that we found there. One was a mushroom that we had identified on a previous walk at Woodhus Slough but others remained a mystery even after creating a spore print and consulting our …

A Good Year for Mushrooms

It seems that every time we take a walk we’re seeing mushrooms. Our stroll at Woodhus Slough last week was no exception. In addition to the Lake’s Boletus we found several other spectacular mushrooms that day, some that we were able to identify and others that we weren’t. Rosy Gomphidius | Gomphidius subroseus Probably the most beautiful (and coolest) mushroom …

Meet a Bolete

Lake's Boletus | Suillus lakei The boletes are one of the groups of mushrooms that are fairly easy to recognize due to the fact that they have pores instead of gills. Run your finger underneath the cap of a potential boletus. If the texture is smooth it is likely that the mushroom you are looking at is a boletus. Earlier …

Mushrooms at Miracle Beach – Part Two

Last weekend Jocie and I collected some mushrooms and made some spore prints. We were lucky to identify a few reasonably conclusively. Today I’m going to introduce you to some of the mushrooms that we struggled to identify. Even though I can’t tell you what these mushrooms are I think that you’ll enjoy them as much as we did! Cortinarius …