Beach Hopper Party at Wickaninnish Beach!

July 11th, 2013 | by | 2 Comments
Published in Crustaceans, Sea Shore
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Sand fleas, beach hoppers, beach fleas – these are a few of the names given to the (usually) small little jumping things leaping about on the sand in a frantic attempt to escape your descending bare feet. At first encounter they can be a bit hard to love, maybe due to the unpredictable trajectory of their jumps and the possibility that they’ll end up on or under your feet looking for shelter if you stand still long enough. Let’s not even consider the havoc that ensues if you happen to be sun bathing and one of these little fellows hops over to visit.

Beach Hopper Frenzy

Mostly California beach hoppers (Megalorchestia californiana) and a few pale beach hoppers (Megalorchestia columbiana) clustered on a piece of seaweed.

Beach hoppers are quite fascinating to watch if you take the time to observe their behaviour. The jumping is definitely entertaining. The devouring of decaying plant material is a bit unnerving and I wasn’t sure if the ones I found were focused on eating the dead seaweed washed up on the beach, mating, defending territory, or eating each other. And then there is the jumping again—makes them challenging to photograph.

 California beach hopper (Megalorchestia californiana)

The larger, and more noticeable, California beach hopper (Megalorchestia californiana).

At Wickaninnish Beach in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve, beach hoppers of two distinctly different sizes can be seen and appreciated. The larger, more obvious species is the California beach hopper (Megalorchestia californiana). The large size (up to 2.7 cm in length) and the bright red antennae make it easy to spot and identify. Rather than springing away, this larger beach hopper will usually scurry along looking for shelter or disappearing into a hole in the sand.

Pale beach hopper (Megalorchestia columbiana)

The smaller pale beach hopper (Megalorchestia columbiana) venturing out from the safety of a hole in the sand.

Also mixed with the California beach hoppers are the pale beach hoppers (Megalorchestia columbiana). These hoppers are smaller (up to 2 cm in length) and paler in colour, with “butterfly” marks on the top. They lack the red antennae and usually make their escape by springing to safety (or in seemingly random directions) by rapidly flexing and straightening their bodies. Note that female California beach hoppers also lack red antennae and aren’t quite as large as the males.

The good thing is that these beach hoppers are harmless (unlike the sometimes aggressive water-line isopods (Cirolana kincaidi) which can be found following the line of the tide) and do an important job breaking down the kelp and other plant material washed up on the shore. Lift up a piece of seaweed and you’re sure to find countless numbers of both species seeking shelter and food in the moist mass of decaying algae. Think about these rather beautiful little amphipods the next time you’re enjoying a sunset walk on the beach and know that part of nature’s clean up crew is hard at work!

Wickaninnish Beach Sunset

Sharing the sunset at Wickaninnish Beach with your new beach hopper friends is a classic West Coast experience.

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Responses

  1. Ingrid says:

    July 18th, 2013 at 11:59 pm (#)

    Thanks so much for this informative piece. I saw your photo on Flickr and had to link over here. I’ve been wanting to see and photograph beach hoppers again, ever since I came upon them a few years ago. Is this a reliable spot for for them, next time I’m on Vancouver Island? Is their appearance seasonal? I haven’t yet been to Wickaninnish Beach so I suppose it’s a good excuse to get me there. Beautiful shots and a lovely post.

  2. IslandNature says:

    July 23rd, 2013 at 11:40 pm (#)

    Hi Ingrid – thanks for stopping in and glad you liked the post. The California beach hoppers seem to be everywhere this year (many on Wickaninnish Beach, but also out on Long Beach and out to Schooner Cove as well) – I don’t remember seeing so many in previous years but it might be the timing.

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