Gold Star in Bloom

March 16th, 2013 | by | Record a Comment
Published in Beaches, Botany, Dunes, Flowers, Landscapes
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Gold Stars (Crocidium multicaule) at Point Holmes

A trio of Gold Stars (Crocidium multicaule) at Point Holmes, Comox, BC.

One of the first wildflowers to bloom here in the Comox Valley is the gold star (Crocidium multicaule). Usually you can expect to see it in early March and this year it was right on schedule, brightening up the coastal gravel flats at Point Holmes and Kin Beach. It’s a small flower, about the size of a quarter, so it is easy to miss. That’s probably why the woman walking at Kin Beach wondered what I was doing lying on the ground photographing … something.

Backlit Gold Star (Crocidium multicaule)

Backlit Gold Star (Crocidium multicaule) at Kin Beach.

This has happened to me several times before. In Paradise Meadows while photographing common butterwort , a couple thought that I had fallen on the boardwalk and were prepared to begin first aid and CPR. When wearing black I have to be careful not to be mistaken for a small bear when hunched over photographing something small. Once I explained myself and she took a look, she started to realize that the flower was everywhere in the weedy looking field.

Gold Stars (Crocidium multicaule) at Point Holmes

Gold Stars (Crocidium multicaule) in bloom on the warm coastal gravel flats at Point Holmes.

While typical gold star habitat has a bit of wasteland look to it, the exposed sand and gravel serve to absorb the heat of the sun and warm the soil, allowing the plant to get a jump start during the cold wet spring. This is a delicate ecosystem and the thinly rooted plants can be easy to disturb. Care must be taken when photographing or observing them.

Gold Star (Crocidium multicaule) at Kin Beach

A closeup of a Gold Star (Crocidium multicaule) at Kin Beach showing both the ray and disc flowers.

What looks like a single flower is actually comprised of a cluster of small ray (outer) and disc (inner) flowers—you have to look closely in order to see them. Fleshy basal leaves help prevent water loss. It’s a little plant growing in a tough environment!

The gold star (Crocidium multicaule) is a gorgeous sign of spring on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. It blooms early and it is best to look for it now before it is done!

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Getting There:

This Google Map shows two of the best locations to view the gold star—Kin Beach and Point Holmes. It also blooms at Goose Spit but tends to be a bit later there. Tree Island is another spectacular location, but more difficult to get to. Small patches can be found at Woodhus Slough as well.


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    Had some time down at the marina in Comox on the weekend. Prefer to look at the small, overlooked parts of the fishing boats and sailboats tied up at the wharf. That’s where the interesting things are.

    Fuji X100S, VSCO Kodak Portra 160


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    Do Not Enter

    So tempting….

    Fuji X100S, VSCO Kodak Portra 160


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    Tires and Red Barrel

    Some things are just arranged just right. I liked the tension between the unstable tires standing on end and the solid red barrel; there’s a suggestion that something terrible is going to happen. Same scene in the day time wouldn’t be quite the same, the artificial light adds extra texture to the cement and old tires.
    Or maybe it’s just an old oil barrel and some tired out tires.
    Fuji X100S


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