Introducing Invasives

An afternoon walk around the Courtenay Estuary revealed almost a dozen of BC’s “least wanted” invasive plant species – either garden escapees or plants that have been introduced to North America from Eurasia and have spread “naturally” throughout the continent. In bloom were Field Bindweed (Morning Glory)(Convolvulus arvensis), Hedge Bindweed (Calystegia sepium), Japanese Knotweed (Fallopia japonica), Common Tansy, Hound’s Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale), Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota), Lady’s Thumb, Night-flowering Catchfly and St. John’s-wort. Scotch broom has gone to seed and Himalayan blackberry is in berry.

  • Hedge Bindweed (Calystegia sepium)
  • Japanese Knotweed (Fallopia japonica)
  • Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota)
  • Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota)
  • Hound’s Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale)
  • Hound’s Tongue (Cynoglossum officinale)

The Invasive Plant Council of BC and Weeds BC websites are excellent starting points to learn more about the impact of invasive plant species in BC and how to identify ones in your own neighbourhood.

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  1. Pingback: Dave Ingram's Natural History Blog :: In a Bind

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